OJ DeJonge Assessment Information

Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress, or M-STEP.

The Michigan Department of Education has developed new summative assessments that are standardized tests students take in the spring.  The M-STEP tests are designed to measure student growth over the course of the school year.   English language arts and mathematics are assessed in grades 3–8, science in grades 4 and 7, and social studies in grades 5 and 8.  It also includes the Michigan Merit Examination in 11th grade, which consists of a college entrance exam, work skills assessment, and M-STEP summative assessments in English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. 

These tests measure higher order thinking as well as "depth of knowledge."  Essentially, they are rigorous tests designed to assess a student's ability to analyze, synthesize, evaluate and apply multiple sources of texts and other data.  We work hard to help our students be successful on these assessments, in learning the knowledge and skills to do well on the items themselves, as well as acquiring the test-taking strategies they will need to successfully navigate the M-Step battery of tests, which are all on-line.

Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress Assessment

We assess our students in math and reading at different points in the year using NWEA tests that thousands of students across the country take each year.  These "Measures of Academic Progress" (MAP) tests assess our students in relation to their grade-level group peers across the United States and allow us to get a read on what specific content and skills need honing.  Students typically take each test in less than an hour.  These are on-line, adaptive skills tests, which means the questions change depending on how well a student is doing on the assessment.  The adaptive skills nature of the test allows us to get an accurate measure of the specific content and skills already mastered, what the student is on the verge of learning and what will need to be taught later.  We gave the test for the first time in the 2014-15  school year, and will use information gleaned from the fall administration of the test in 2015-16 to help each student set learning goals in math and reading for the year.  Teachers will use class results to inform their classroom instruction.  We also use NWEA results as one data point in determining what students will need what type of intervention that we provide, whether it be reading support, Math Foundations class, Extended Day Math Help, Skills Advantage class or academic mentoring.